Micro
food brands

Perspective

06/16/2017
“GREAT THINGS ARE DONE BY A SERIES OF SMALL THINGS BROUGHT TOGETHER” – Vincent van Gogh
 

Many large brands and companies began as microbrands, and the magic of small brands with big ambitions and unique ways of driving momentum continue to inspire the industry. ThoughtMatter prides itself on working with culture shifters—small brands that are making a big difference, through illumination, ingenuity and thoughtfulness.

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ILLUMINATED SYSTEMS

Consumers are invested in the relationships brands maintain with the public and other entities in their respective supply chains. They seek to relate on a personal level to the products they purchase. And they scrutinize the social, economic and political relationships products have with other people and organizations. Microbrands inherently understand these connections because of an intimate relationship with the consumer that larger brands simply cannot create or maintain. Microbrands forge—from the ground up—a transparent production process, and every single interaction with the consumer serves to further illuminate this process.

THE JOY OF INGENUITY

There is something to be said for constraints—for not having every resource at your disposal, for limited options that compel you to come up with creative solutions to interesting challenges. And microbrands are adept at managing such constraints. They counteract the fact that they lack the resources of major brands through their creativity and willingness to embrace unconventional means to achieve and exceed their goals. To make an idea a reality or to solve a particularly difficult problem, there must be a spirit of ingenuity and malleability; a willingness to approach challenges with tailored solutions. The death of any new idea is accelerated by the stubborn mindset epitomized by this refrain: “We’ve always done it that way.” Microbrands are not victims of this mentality and, consequently, often disrupt industries through bold, innovative business models.

THOUGHTFULNESS

Some say the devil is in the details, but we’d argue that the consumers are in the details. Many of the small food brands that have taken off in recent years have closely and attentively attended to the smallest details of their product experience. These small brands often speak directly to their consumers in an effort to understand their needs and desires, then take this feedback and incorporate it into every touchpoint. They don’t play to averages, choosing instead to design for real people: the consumers they know are using their products. Brands of all sizes can benefit from understanding that every small detail and moment in which a consumer engages with a brand is much more than minutiae. They’re opportunities to provide satisfaction and garner loyalty.

More Thoughts.

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